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As the rules change or new procedures are developed, please note that these interpretation and/or guidance may not apply; you should always refer to the latest rules and guidance documents to determine what equipment authorization procedures should be followed. For the latest guidance on specific topics or you don't know where to start, please feel free to contact GTG Group experts.

Stadium lamps have become an essential component in the world of sports. They enable athletes to continue playing even after the sun has set, and provide spectators with the ability to watch the game in high definition.

How can GTG assist you with the tests on stadium lamp?

(1) Electrical safety test

The electrical safety test measures the safety of the stadium light during operation. This test ensures that the stadium light does not pose any electrical hazards to players or spectators.

  • Insulation resistance test: this test is conducted to ensure that the insulation of the stadium lamp is of a sufficient level. If the insulation is not adequate, there is a risk of electric shock. The test involves measuring the resistance between the live parts of the lamp and the earth.
  • Earth continuity test: this test checks the continuity of the earth wire in the stadium lamp. A broken earth wire can be dangerous as it can result in a risk of electric shock. The test involves measuring the resistance between the earth wire and the earth.
  • Leakage current test: this test measures the amount of current that is leaking from the stadium lamp. A high level of leakage current can be dangerous as it can result in a risk of electric shock. The test involves measuring the current that flows between the live parts of the lamp and the earth.
  • Voltage test: this test checks the voltage of the stadium lamp. A high voltage can be dangerous as it can result in a risk of electric shock. The test involves measuring the voltage between the live parts of the lamp and the earth.
  • Load test: this test checks the performance of the stadium lamp under load conditions. A malfunctioning lamp can be dangerous as it can result in a risk of fire. The test involves checking the performance of the lamp under normal load conditions.

(2) Photometric test

Stadium lamps are required to meet specific standards for illuminance, uniformity, glare, and color rendering. Photometric testing ensures that these standards are met, and that the lamps are safe for use by players and spectators. It also helps to identify any potential issues with the lamps, such as glare or inadequate illumination.

  • Lumen output test: the lumen output test measures the total amount of light produced by the stadium light. This test is essential as it determines the overall brightness of the light. The higher the lumen output, the brighter the light. This test is usually conducted in a dark room using a photometer.
  • Beam angle test: the beam angle test measures the angle of the light emitted by the stadium light. This test is crucial as it determines how wide or narrow the light beam is. A wider beam angle is ideal for sports events as it provides better illumination of the playing surface. This test is conducted using a goniophotometer.
  • Color temperature test: the color temperature test measures the color of the light emitted by the stadium light. The color temperature is measured in Kelvin (K). A higher Kelvin value means that the light appears more blue, while a lower Kelvin value means that the light appears more yellow. This test is usually conducted using a spectrometer.
  • Color rendering index test: the color rendering index (CRI) test measures how accurately the stadium light reproduces colors. This test is essential as it ensures that players can distinguish between different colors on the playing surface. The higher the CRI value, the better the color rendering. This test is conducted using a spectrometer.
  • Flicker test: the flicker test measures the amount of flicker produced by the stadium light. Flicker can be detrimental to sports events as it can cause discomfort and disorientation to players and spectators alike. This test is conducted using a flicker meter.
  • Glare test: the glare test measures the amount of glare produced by the stadium light. Glare can be distracting and can cause discomfort to players and spectators. This test is conducted using a glare meter.
  • Uniformity test: the uniformity test measures the evenness of the light distribution on the playing surface. Uniformity is crucial as it ensures that there are no dark spots or shadows on the playing surface. This test is conducted using a lux meter.
  • Spill light test: the spill light test measures the amount of light that spills outside the playing surface. Spill light can be distracting to players and spectators and can also cause light pollution. This test is conducted using a lux meter.

(3) Photobiological safety test

The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has set the photobiological safety standards for light sources that emit optical radiation. The standards set the maximum permissible exposure limits (MPE) for different wavelengths of light. The MPE is the highest level of exposure that a person can safely receive without experiencing any adverse effects.

  • Spectral analysis: spectral analysis is conducted to determine the spectral power distribution of the stadium lights. This test shows the intensity of different wavelength bands of light emitted by the lamp. The results of this test are used to calculate the hazard potential of the light source.
  • Irradiance measurement: irradiance measurement is conducted to determine the amount of radiation that is emitted by the stadium lamp. The test measures the amount of energy that is absorbed by a surface area per unit time. This test is crucial as it determines the level of exposure that an individual may experience when in the vicinity of the stadium lights.
  • Ultraviolet radiation test: ultraviolet radiation test is conducted to determine the amount of ultraviolet radiation emitted by the stadium lights. Ultraviolet radiation can cause skin cancer and other adverse health effects. Therefore, it is crucial to test the amount of ultraviolet radiation that is emitted by the stadium lights.
  • Infrared radiation test: infrared radiation test is conducted to determine the amount of infrared radiation emitted by the stadium lights. This test is important as excessive exposure to infrared radiation can lead to skin burns and other adverse health effects.
  • Flicker test: flicker is the rapid change in the intensity of light emitted by the stadium lamp. This test is important as excessive flicker can cause health effects such as headaches, seizures, and other adverse health effects..
  • Glare test: glare test is conducted to determine the amount of glare emitted by the stadium lights. This test is important as excessive glare can cause eye strain and other adverse health effects.

(4) EMC test

EMC is a discipline that deals with the ability of electronic devices to operate in an electromagnetic environment without causing electromagnetic interference to other devices or being affected by electromagnetic interference from other devices. The EMC standards define the limits of electromagnetic emissions and the levels of immunity that electronic devices must comply with.

  • Radiated emissions test: this test measures the amount of electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Stadium Lamp. The lamp is placed in a shielded room, and its emissions are measured using a spectrum analyzer. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).
  • Conducted emissions test: this test measures the amount of electromagnetic interference (EMI) that the Stadium Lamp emits through its power cord. The lamp is connected to a power source, and its emissions are measured using a spectrum analyzer. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the FCC.
  • Electrostatic discharge (ESD) test: this test measures the ability of the Stadium Lamp to withstand electrostatic discharges. The lamp is subjected to a series of ESD events, and its performance is monitored. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).
  • Radiated immunity test: this test measures the ability of the Stadium Lamp to withstand electromagnetic radiation from other sources. The lamp is placed in a shielded room, and its performance is monitored while it is exposed to various levels of electromagnetic radiation. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the IEC.
  • Conducted immunity test: this test measures the ability of the Stadium Lamp to withstand EMI from other sources. The lamp is connected to a power source, and its performance is monitored while it is exposed to various levels of EMI. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the IEC.
  • Surge test: this test measures the ability of the Stadium Lamp to withstand power surges. The lamp is subjected to a series of power surges, and its performance is monitored. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the IEC.
  • Voltage dip test: this test measures the ability of the Stadium Lamp to withstand voltage dips. The lamp is subjected to a series of voltage dips, and its performance is monitored. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the IEC.
  • Magnetic field immunity test: this test measures the ability of the Stadium Lamp to withstand magnetic fields. The lamp is subjected to various levels of magnetic fields, and its performance is monitored. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the IEC.
  • Conducted susceptibility test: this test measures the susceptibility of the Stadium Lamp to EMI from other sources. The lamp is connected to a power source, and its performance is monitored while it is exposed to various levels of EMI. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the IEC.
  • Radiated susceptibility test: this test measures the susceptibility of the Stadium Lamp to electromagnetic radiation from other sources. The lamp is placed in a shielded room, and its performance is monitored while it is exposed to various levels of electromagnetic radiation. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the IEC.
  • Power frequency magnetic field test: this test measures the ability of the Stadium Lamp to withstand power frequency magnetic fields. The lamp is subjected to various levels of power frequency magnetic fields, and its performance is monitored. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the IEC.
  • Harmonic current emissions test: this test measures the amount of harmonic current that the Stadium Lamp emits through its power cord. The lamp is connected to a power source, and its emissions are measured using a spectrum analyzer. The results are compared to the limits set by regulatory bodies such as the IEC.

(5) Energy efficiency test

Energy efficiency tests on stadium lamps typically involve measuring the luminous efficacy of the lamp, which is the ratio of light output (in lumens) to electrical power input (in watts). The higher the luminous efficacy, the more efficient the lamp is at converting electrical energy into visible light.

Specific tests conducted on stadium lamps include:

  • Lumen output measurement: this test determines the total amount of visible light emitted by the lamp. It is usually measured using a photometer or integrating sphere.
  • Power consumption measurement: This test measures the electrical power consumed by the lamp while operating. It can be measured using a wattmeter or power analyzer.

These tests are typically conducted by lighting manufacturers, independent testing laboratories, or certification organizations. Certifications such as ENERGY STAR, DLC, or specific regional standards indicate that a stadium lamp has undergone rigorous testing and meets certain energy efficiency criteria.

(6) Mechanical tests

Before these stadium lamps can be installed, they must undergo a series of mechanical tests to ensure their safety, functionality, and reliability.

  • Stress test: stress test involves subjecting the stadium lamp to extreme levels of stress to assess its strength and durability. The test measures the lamp’s ability to withstand high winds, heavy rain, and other harsh weather conditions that it may encounter during its lifespan.
  • Shock test: shock test involves dropping the stadium lamp from various heights to test its resilience against impacts. This test mimics the impact that a lamp might experience when hit by a flying object or when accidentally knocked over.
  • Vibration test: vibration test involves subjecting the stadium lamp to vibrations to assess its ability to withstand vibrations from nearby construction or road traffic. The test mimics the vibrations that the lamp might experience during its lifespan.
  • Drop test: drop test involves dropping the stadium lamp from various angles and heights to test its ability to withstand accidental drops. The test measures the lamp’s ability to sustain its performance after being dropped.

(7) Environmental test

  • Thermal test: thermal test involves subjecting the stadium lamp to extreme temperatures to test its ability to operate in both hot and cold weather conditions. The test measures the lamp’s ability to withstand temperature fluctuations without affecting its performance.
  • Humidity test: humidity test involves exposing the stadium lamp to high levels of humidity to test its ability to withstand moisture. The test measures the lamp’s ability to resist corrosion and water damage.
  • Salt spray test: salt spray test involves exposing the stadium lamp to a saltwater solution to test its ability to withstand corrosion caused by salty air or water. The test measures the lamp’s ability to resist damage caused by prolonged exposure to salty environments.
  • Dust test: dust test involves subjecting the stadium lamp to a dusty environment to test its ability to resist dust and dirt. The test measures the lamp’s ability to sustain its performance in dusty environments without affecting its functionality.
  • Water resistance test: water resistance testing involves subjecting the stadium lamp to various levels of water pressure to test its ability to resist water damage. The test measures the lamp’s ability to operate in wet environments without affecting its performance.

How can GTG assist you with the certifications or markings for stadium lamp?

(1) IEC certification

IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) certification is a globally recognized certification that ensures the quality, safety, and reliability of electrical products, including stadium lights. The certification checks for factors such as electrical safety, electromagnetic compatibility, and environmental compatibility.

(2) CB scheme

The CB Scheme is an international system for mutual recognition of test reports and certificates for safety of electrical and electronic components, equipment, and products. Compliance with the CB Scheme indicates that a product has been tested and meets safety requirements set by participating organizations.

(3) CE marking

This marking is a certification that indicates that a product is compliant with European Union safety standards. It is mandatory for products sold within the EU and is often used as a benchmark for safety in other countries.

(4) UL listing

Underwriters Laboratories is an American safety consulting and certification company that provides product safety testing and certification. UL Listing indicates that a product has been tested and meets safety standards set by UL.

(5) FCC certification

The Federal Communications Commission is a US government agency that regulates communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable. FCC certification indicates that a product meets the agency’s electromagnetic interference standards.

(6) RoHS certification

The Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) certification ensures that the product does not contain any hazardous substances such as lead, cadmium, or mercury. Stadium lighting fixtures must have RoHS certification to be compliant with European Union standards.

(7) IP rating

The International Protection (IP) rating indicates the degree of protection against water and dust ingress. Stadium lighting fixtures must have a minimum IP rating of 65 to be compliant with outdoor installation standards.

Why the biggest brands trust GTG Group?

GTG Group (Global Testing Group) is a certification company that offers testing and certification services to different industries. Our expertise in stadium lamp testing and certification has made us a trusted name in the industry.

(1) Independent and impartial testing

GTG Group is a third-party testing company, which means we are not affiliated with any specific manufacturer. This impartiality can provide camera manufacturers and consumers with confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the testing process, and ensure that the camera meets the required standards.

(2) Confidentiality and security

GTG Group understands the importance of confidentiality and security when it comes to testing and certification. We ensure that our clients’ data and information are kept confidential and secure at all times. This ensures that our clients’ intellectual property and trade secrets are protected.

Contact GTG Group today for stadium lamp testing and certification to avoid any legal issues that may arise from using a faulty stadium lamp.

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© 2024 GTG Group | Global Testing Group. All rights reserved.