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As the rules change or new procedures are developed, please note that these interpretation and/or guidance may not apply; you should always refer to the latest rules and guidance documents to determine what equipment authorization procedures should be followed. For the latest guidance on specific topics or you don't know where to start, please feel free to contact GTG experts.

Downlights, also known as recessed lights or pot lights, are recessed light fixtures that are installed into a ceiling or wall. They are designed to provide a clean and modern look, with the light source being hidden within the ceiling or wall. Downlights work by using a reflector and lens system to direct light downwards.

How can GTG assist you with the tests on downlights?

(1) Electrical safety test

  • Insulation resistance test: the insulation resistance test is carried out to determine whether the insulation between conductors and ground is adequate. A low insulation resistance reading indicates that the downlight is not adequately insulated, which could lead to electrical shock.
  • Earth continuity test: the earth continuity test checks whether the downlight is correctly earthed. This is important because a downlight that is not correctly earthed could pose a significant electrical risk. During this test, the earth continuity resistance is measured to ensure it is below the recommended value.
  • Polarity test: the polarity test is carried out to ensure that the downlight is wired correctly. A downlight that is wired incorrectly could pose a significant risk of electrical shock. During this test, the polarity of the downlight is checked to ensure it is wired correctly.
  • Voltage test: the voltage test is carried out to ensure that the downlight is receiving the correct voltage. This is important because a downlight that is receiving too much or too little voltage could pose a significant electrical risk. During this test, the voltage of the downlight is measured to ensure it is within the recommended range.
  • Current leakage test: the current leakage test checks whether there is any current leakage from the downlight. This is important because current leakage could lead to electrical shock. During this test, the current leakage is measured to ensure it is below the recommended value.
  • Insulation resistance test (after installation): the insulation resistance test should be carried out again after the downlight has been installed. This is important because installation could affect the insulation of the downlight. During this test, the insulation resistance of the downlight is measured to ensure it is adequate.
  • Earth continuity test (after installation): the earth continuity test should be carried out again after the downlight has been installed. This is important because installation could affect the earth continuity of the downlight. During this test, the earth continuity resistance of the downlight is measured to ensure it is below the recommended value.
  • Functional test: the functional test is carried out to ensure that the downlight is functioning correctly. This is important because a downlight that is not functioning correctly could pose a significant electrical risk. During this test, the downlight is switched on and off to ensure it is functioning correctly.

(2) Photometric test

  • Luminous flux test: the luminous flux test measures the total amount of light emitted by a light source. It is measured in lumens and is an essential test for LED downlights. The higher the luminous flux, the brighter the light emitted. This test is essential when choosing the right LED downlights for large spaces, such as commercial buildings or warehouses.
  • Color rendering index test: the Color Rendering Index (CRI) test is used to measure how accurately a light source can replicate colors. It is measured on a scale of 0-100, with 100 being the highest accuracy. This test is crucial for LED downlights used in spaces where color accuracy is essential, such as art studios or photography studios.
  • Color temperature test: the color temperature test measures the color of light emitted by the light source. The color temperature is measured in Kelvin (K), with lower numbers indicating a warmer, yellowish light, and higher numbers indicating a cooler, bluish light. This test is essential when choosing LED downlights for spaces where the color of light can affect the mood, such as restaurants or hotels.
  • Beam angle test: the beam angle test measures the spread of light emitted by the light source. It is measured in degrees and is essential when choosing LED downlights for spaces where the angle of light can affect the functionality, such as office spaces or libraries.
  • Glare test: the glare test measures the amount of discomfort caused by the light source. It is measured on a scale of 0-1000, with 0 being no discomfort and 1000 being severe discomfort. This test is essential when choosing LED downlights for spaces where glare can affect visual tasks, such as computer workstations or reading areas.
  • Flicker test: the flicker test measures the frequency of light emitted by the light source. Flicker can cause eye strain and discomfort, and this test is essential when choosing LED downlights for spaces where people spend extended periods, such as hospitals or classrooms.
  • Uniformity test: the uniformity test measures the consistency of lighting across a space. It is essential when choosing LED downlights for spaces where consistency is essential, such as conference rooms or exhibition spaces.
  • Dimming test: the dimming test measures the ability of the light source to dim smoothly. It is crucial when choosing LED downlights for spaces where lighting levels need to be adjusted, such as theaters or lecture halls.

(3) Photobiological safety test

To ensure the safety of downlights, manufacturers often conduct photobiological safety tests according to international standards such as IEC 62471. These tests measure the harmful effects of light on the skin, eyes, and other body parts, including the risk of retinal damage and skin burns. The results of these tests help determine the appropriate classification of the light source and any necessary safety precautions.

  • Spectral irradiance: spectral irradiance is a measure of the intensity of light at different wavelengths. This test measures the spectral irradiance of downlights to ensure that they do not emit harmful radiation that can cause harm to people.
  • Radiant flux: radiant flux is a measure of the total amount of light emitted by a light source. This test measures the radiant flux of downlights to ensure that they are not emitting too much light that can cause harm to people.
  • Maximum permissible exposure: xaximum permissible exposure is the maximum exposure time to light that is safe for human health. This test measures the maximum permissible exposure of downlights to ensure that they do not exceed the safe exposure time.
  • Blue light hazard: blue light hazard is the potential risk of blue light to human health. This test measures the blue light hazard of downlights to ensure that they do not emit harmful blue light that can cause harm to people.
  • Flicker: flicker is the rapid variation in light intensity that can cause discomfort and other health problems. This test measures the flicker of downlights to ensure that they do not flicker at a rate that can cause harm to people.
  • UV radiation: UV radiation is harmful radiation that can cause skin cancer and other health problems. This test measures the UV radiation emitted by downlights to ensure that they do not emit harmful UV radiation that can cause harm to people.
  • Infrared radiation: infrared radiation is a form of radiation that can cause skin burns and other health problems. This test measures the infrared radiation emitted by downlights to ensure that they do not emit harmful infrared radiation that can cause harm to people.

(4) EMC test

  • Radiated emissions test: the radiated emissions test is designed to measure the amount of electromagnetic energy that an electronic device emits. During this test, the downlight is placed in an anechoic chamber, and a spectrum analyzer is used to measure the amount of electromagnetic energy that the downlight emits. The downlight must not exceed the legal limits set by regulatory bodies.
  • Conducted emissions test: the conducted emissions test is conducted to measure the amount of electromagnetic energy that the downlight emits through its power supply. During this test, the downlight is connected to a power source, and a spectrum analyzer is used to measure the amount of electromagnetic energy that the downlight emits through its power supply.
  • Electrostatic discharge (ESD) test: the electrostatic discharge test is conducted to measure the downlight’s ability to withstand electrostatic discharge. During this test, the downlight is subjected to a high voltage discharge, simulating static electricity, and the downlight must continue to function correctly.
  • Electrical fast transient (EFT) test: the EFT test is conducted to measure the downlight’s ability to withstand sudden electrical surges. During this test, the downlight is subjected to a series of electrical surges, and the downlight must continue to function correctly.
  • Surge immunity test: the surge immunity test is conducted to measure the downlight’s ability to withstand sudden voltage spikes. During this test, the downlight is subjected to a series of voltage spikes, and the downlight must continue to function correctly.
  • Voltage dips, interruptions, and variations test: the voltage dips, interruptions, and variations test is conducted to measure the downlight’s ability to withstand voltage fluctuations. During this test, the downlight is subjected to a series of voltage fluctuations, and the downlight must continue to function correctly.
  • Magnetic field immunity test: the magnetic field immunity test is conducted to measure the downlight’s ability to withstand magnetic fields. During this test, the downlight is subjected to a strong magnetic field, and the downlight must continue to function correctly.
  • Conducted RF immunity test: the conducted RF immunity test is conducted to measure the downlight’s ability to withstand electromagnetic interference. During this test, the downlight is subjected to a series of electromagnetic interference, and the downlight must continue to function correctly.
  • Radiated RF immunity test: the radiated RF immunity test is conducted to measure the downlight’s ability to withstand electromagnetic interference. During this test, the downlight is subjected to a series of electromagnetic interference, and the downlight must continue to function correctly.
  • Power frequency magnetic field immunity test: the power frequency magnetic field immunity test is conducted to measure the downlight’s ability to withstand low-frequency magnetic fields. During this test, the downlight is subjected to a low-frequency magnetic field, and the downlight must continue to function correctly.
  • Voltage fluctuations and flicker test: the voltage fluctuations and flicker test are conducted to measure the downlight’s ability to withstand voltage fluctuations and flickering. During this test, the downlight is subjected to a series of voltage fluctuations and flickering, and the downlight must continue to function correctly.
  • Harmonic current emissions test: the harmonic current emissions test is conducted to measure the amount of harmonic currents that the downlight produces. During this test, the downlight is connected to a power source, and a spectrum analyzer is used to measure the amount of harmonic currents that the downlight produces. The downlight must not exceed the legal limits set by regulatory bodies.

(5) Energy efficiency test

When it comes to energy efficiency tests on downlights, there are specific parameters that are evaluated. These tests help determine how effectively a downlight converts electrical energy into visible light. Here are some key aspects of energy efficiency testing for downlights:

  • Luminous efficacy: luminous efficacy measures the amount of visible light output per unit of electrical power consumed. It is typically expressed in lumens per watt (lm/W). Higher values indicate greater energy efficiency, as more light is produced with less power consumption.
  • Power factor: power factor is a measure of how effectively a downlight utilizes the electrical power supplied to it. It represents the ratio of real power (used by the downlight) to apparent power (supplied by the electrical system). A higher power factor indicates better utilization of electrical energy.
  • Efficiency of driver: downlights often incorporate electronic drivers that regulate the power supply to the LED light source. The efficiency of the driver is evaluated to ensure minimal energy losses during the conversion process. Higher driver efficiency means less wasted energy.

(6) Mechanical tests

  • Impact test: impact test involves dropping the downlight from a specific height onto a hard surface to ensure it can withstand accidental impacts without breaking or cracking.
  • Vibration test: vibration test simulates the vibrations that a downlight may experience during transportation or installation. The downlight is subjected to various frequencies and amplitudes of vibration to ensure it can withstand these conditions without any damage.
  • Torsion test: torsion testing is used to ensure that downlights can withstand twisting forces without breaking or cracking. This test involves applying a twisting force to the downlight to determine its maximum torsion capacity.
  • Compression test: compression test is important for downlights that will be installed in areas with heavy foot traffic or other potential sources of compression. This test involves applying a specific amount of force to the downlight to ensure that it can withstand the pressure without breaking or cracking.
  • Pull test: pull test is used to ensure that the downlight can withstand the force of being pulled or tugged without coming loose from its mounting. This test involves applying a specific amount of force to the downlight in a pulling motion to determine its maximum pull capacity.
  •  Life test: life test is used to determine the downlight’s lifespan under normal operating conditions. This testing involves running the downlight continuously for a specified period to see how long it lasts before failing.

(7) Environmental test

  • Temperature test: temperature test is crucial to ensure that downlights can withstand the high temperatures they may encounter during use. This test involves exposing the downlight to high temperatures for a specified period to ensure that it can handle the heat without melting or deforming.
  • Moisture test: moisture test involves exposing the downlight to high levels of moisture to ensure that it can withstand damp or humid conditions without any damage. This is particularly important in areas with high humidity levels.
  • Corrosion test: corrosion test is crucial for downlights that will be used in outdoor or marine environments. This test involves exposing the downlight to saltwater or other corrosive substances to ensure that it can withstand these conditions without corroding or rusting.
  • Heat test (thermal test): the heat test is carried out to ensure that the downlight is not getting too hot. Overheating could lead to a fire, which could pose a significant risk to life and property. During this test, the temperature of the downlight is measured to ensure it is within the recommended range.
  •  Ingress protection (IP) test: an ingress protection test checks how well the downlight is protected against dust and water. This ensures that the downlight can be safely used in damp or wet environments.

How can GTG assist you with the certifications or markings for downlights?

(1) CE certification

The CE certification is a mandatory certification for all products sold in the European Union. It indicates that a product has met the safety, health, and environmental requirements of the EU. Any downlight that is intended to be sold in the EU must have this certification.

(2) UL certification

UL Certification is a certification issued by Underwriters Laboratories, a safety consulting and certification company based in the United States. This certification indicates that a product has been tested and meets the safety standards of the US. Downlights with this certification are safe to use in the US.

(3) FCC certification

The FCC certification is issued by the Federal Communications Commission in the US. This certification ensures that a product does not emit harmful radio frequency radiation. Downlights with this certification are safe to use in the US.

(4) Energy Star certification

Energy Star is a voluntary certification program in the US that is aimed at promoting energy-efficient products. Downlights with this certification are energy-efficient and can help reduce your energy bills.

(5) RoHS certification

RoHS stands for Restriction of Hazardous Substances. This certification ensures that a product does not contain any hazardous substances that could be harmful to the environment or human health. Downlights with this certification are safe to use and environmentally friendly.

(6) DLC certification

The DLC certification is a voluntary certification program in the US that is aimed at promoting energy-efficient lighting. Downlights with this certification are energy-efficient and can help reduce your energy bills.

(7) SASO certification

SASO stands for Saudi Arabian Standards Organization. This certification is mandatory for products sold in Saudi Arabia. It ensures that the product meets the safety and quality standards set by the Saudi Arabian government.

(8) C-Tick certification

The C-Tick certification is issued by the Australian Communications and Media Authority. This certification ensures that a product does not emit electromagnetic radiation that could interfere with other electronic equipment. Downlights with this certification are safe to use in Australia.

Why the biggest brands trust GTG Group?

GTG Group (Global Testing Group) is a certification company that offers testing and certification services to different industries. Our expertise in downlights testing and certification has made us a trusted name in the industry.

(1) Independent and impartial testing

GTG Group is a third-party testing company, which means we are not affiliated with any specific manufacturer. This impartiality can provide camera manufacturers and consumers with confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the testing process, and ensure that the camera meets the required standards.

(2) Confidentiality and security

GTG Group understands the importance of confidentiality and security when it comes to testing and certification. We ensure that our clients’ data and information are kept confidential and secure at all times. This ensures that our clients’ intellectual property and trade secrets are protected.

Contact GTG Group today for downlights testing and certification to avoid any legal issues that may arise from using faulty downlights.

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© 2023 GTG | Global Testing Group. All rights reserved.